Australian Bicameral System MCQs with Answer

Which of the following is a chamber in the Australian Parliament?
A) House of Lords
B) House of Representatives
C) House of Commons
D) Senate
Answer:
D) Senate

What is the primary function of the Australian Senate?
A) Enforcing laws
B) Initiating budget bills
C) Reviewing legislation
D) Appointing judges
Answer:
C) Reviewing legislation

Which chamber in Australia’s Parliament represents the states?
A) House of Representatives
B) Cabinet
C) Senate
D) High Court
Answer:
C) Senate

How are members of the Australian House of Representatives elected?
A) By popular vote in the entire country
B) By appointment from state governors
C) By a combination of state and federal votes
D) By popular vote within individual electoral divisions
Answer:
D) By popular vote within individual electoral divisions

What is the minimum voting age in Australian federal elections?
A) 16 years
B) 18 years
C) 21 years
D) 25 years
Answer:
B) 18 years

How many members are there in the Australian House of Representatives?
A) 76
B) 150
C) 100
D) 200
Answer:
B) 150

In the Australian Senate, how many senators represent each state and territory?
A) 3 senators per state, 2 per territory
B) 2 senators per state, 3 per territory
C) 5 senators per state, 1 per territory
D) 4 senators per state, 2 per territory
Answer:
A) 3 senators per state, 2 per territory

Which chamber of the Australian Parliament has the power to propose and amend money bills?
A) House of Representatives
B) Senate
C) Governor-General
D) High Court
Answer:
A) House of Representatives

How long is the term of office for members of the Australian House of Representatives?
A) 2 years
B) 3 years
C) 4 years
D) 5 years
Answer:
B) 3 years

Which chamber of the Australian Parliament has the power to conduct inquiries and investigations?
A) House of Representatives
B) Senate
C) Cabinet
D) Prime Minister’s Office
Answer:
B) Senate

What is the role of the Speaker in the Australian House of Representatives?
A) Represents the head of state
B) Presides over the chamber’s debates
C) Oversees the Senate’s proceedings
D) Represents the government in the House
Answer:
B) Presides over the chamber’s debates

How often are federal elections generally held in Australia?
A) Every 2 years
B) Every 3 years
C) Every 4 years
D) Every 5 years
Answer:
C) Every 4 years

Which of the following is NOT a power of the Australian Senate?
A) Reviewing and amending legislation
B) Initiating and amending money bills
C) Conducting inquiries and investigations
D) Confirming appointments of government officials
Answer:
B) Initiating and amending money bills

How are members of the Australian Senate elected?
A) By direct election by the people
B) By appointment by the Prime Minister
C) By nomination from state governors
D) By an electoral college system
Answer:
A) By direct election by the people

What is the maximum term length for a senator in the Australian Parliament?
A) 6 years
B) 8 years
C) 10 years
D) 12 years
Answer:
A) 6 years

Who holds the power to dissolve the House of Representatives in Australia?
A) Governor-General
B) Prime Minister
C) Chief Justice
D) Speaker of the House
Answer:
A) Governor-General

In the Australian Parliament, which chamber is more powerful in terms of initiating financial bills?
A) House of Representatives
B) Senate
C) Both have equal powers
D) Governor-General
Answer:
A) House of Representatives

What happens if there is a disagreement between the House of Representatives and the Senate over a bill?
A) The Prime Minister makes the final decision
B) The bill is sent to the High Court for judgment
C) The Governor-General resolves the deadlock
D) The bill is rejected and cannot become law
Answer:
C) The Governor-General resolves the deadlock

How is the leader of the Australian government determined?
A) Directly elected by the people
B) Chosen by the Senate
C) Leader of the majority party in the House of Representatives
D) Appointed by the Governor-General
Answer:
C) Leader of the majority party in the House of Representatives

Which chamber of the Australian Parliament has the power to conduct impeachment proceedings against government officials?
A) House of Representatives
B) Senate
C) Governor-General
D) High Court
Answer:
B) Senate

How often does the Australian Senate elect its President?
A) Every year
B) Every 2 years
C) Every 3 years
D) Every 6 years
Answer:
A) Every year

What is the constitutional significance of a double dissolution in Australia?
A) It dissolves both houses of Parliament
B) It suspends the powers of the Senate
C) It extends the term of the House of Representatives
D) It increases the number of senators per state
Answer:
A) It dissolves both houses of Parliament

How is a bill passed into law in the Australian Parliament?
A) By a majority vote in the House of Representatives only
B) By a majority vote in both the House of Representatives and the Senate
C) By the Prime Minister’s approval
D) By a majority vote in the Senate only
Answer:
B) By a majority vote in both the House of Representatives and the Senate

Who has the power to appoint ministers to the Australian government?
A) Governor-General
B) Chief Justice
C) Leader of the Opposition
D) President of the Senate
Answer:
A) Governor-General

What is the role of the Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament?
A) To oversee the Senate’s proceedings
B) To advise the Governor-General
C) To lead the minority party in the House of Representatives
D) To preside over the Cabinet meetings
Answer:
C) To lead the minority party in the House of Representatives

How many votes are required in the Australian Parliament to remove a Prime Minister from office?
A) Simple majority in the House of Representatives
B) Two-thirds majority in the House of Representatives
C) Majority in both houses of Parliament
D) Approval from the Governor-General
Answer:
A) Simple majority in the House of Representatives

Which chamber of the Australian Parliament has the power to block supply bills, triggering a constitutional crisis?
A) House of Representatives
B) Senate
C) Governor-General
D) High Court
Answer:
B) Senate

Who has the authority to prorogue or dissolve the Australian Parliament?
A) Governor-General
B) Prime Minister
C) President of the Senate
D) Speaker of the House
Answer:
A) Governor-General

What happens if a bill is passed by both houses of the Australian Parliament but is not given Royal Assent?
A) It becomes law automatically after a certain period
B) It is sent for a national referendum
C) It is deemed unconstitutional and void
D) It is sent back to the Senate for revision
Answer:
A) It becomes law automatically after a certain period

Who has the power to dissolve the Australian Senate in certain circumstances?
A) Prime Minister
B) Governor-General
C) President of the Senate
D) Chief Justice
Answer:
B) Governor-General

In the event of a tie vote in the Australian Senate, what action is taken?
A) The Speaker casts the deciding vote
B) The bill is sent back to the House of Representatives
C) The President of the Senate casts the deciding vote
D) The bill is rejected
Answer:
C) The President of the Senate casts the deciding vote

Which chamber of the Australian Parliament has the power to conduct inquiries into government administration?
A) House of Representatives
B) Senate
C) Governor-General
D) High Court
Answer:
B) Senate

What is the process called when the Australian Senate rejects a bill passed by the House of Representatives and vice versa?
A) Disagreement process
B) Deadlock resolution
C) Double dissolution
D) Constitutional crisis
Answer:
A) Disagreement process

Who is the presiding officer in the Australian Senate?
A) Speaker
B) Prime Minister
C) President
D) Chief Justice
Answer:
C) President

In the Australian Parliament, which chamber holds the power to initiate and pass non-financial legislation?
A) House of Representatives
B) Senate
C) Both have equal powers
D) Governor-General
Answer:
C) Both have equal powers

What role does the Governor-General play in the Australian Parliament?
A) Head of the government
B) Represents the Queen
C) Leads the Cabinet meetings
D) Chief Justice of the High Court
Answer:
B) Represents the Queen

Which chamber of the Australian Parliament has the power to initiate an impeachment process against the Prime Minister?
A) House of Representatives
B) Senate
C) Governor-General
D) High Court
Answer:
B) Senate

What is the significance of a vote of no confidence in the Australian House of Representatives?
A) It leads to the dissolution of the House
B) It requires the Governor-General’s approval
C) It triggers a change in the President of the Senate
D) It is advisory and non-binding
Answer:
A) It leads to the dissolution of the House

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