Australian House of Representatives MCQs with Answer

Which political party won the most seats in the Australian House of Representatives in the last federal election?

A) Liberal Party
B) Australian Labor Party
C) The Nationals
D) Greens
Answer: B) Australian Labor Party
What is the minimum age requirement for a person to be elected as a member of the House of Representatives?

A) 18 years
B) 21 years
C) 25 years
D) 30 years
Answer: A) 18 years
How often are federal elections for the House of Representatives held in Australia?

A) Every 2 years
B) Every 3 years
C) Every 4 years
D) Every 5 years
Answer: B) Every 3 years
What is the total number of members in the Australian House of Representatives?

A) 100
B) 150
C) 200
D) 250
Answer: B) 150
The Speaker of the House of Representatives is usually:

A) A member of the majority party
B) An appointed judge
C) A senator
D) Chosen by the Prime Minister
Answer: A) A member of the majority party
Which Australian state has the most number of seats in the House of Representatives?

A) New South Wales
B) Queensland
C) Victoria
D) Western Australia
Answer: A) New South Wales
Members of the House of Representatives are elected through which voting system?

A) Proportional representation
B) Preferential voting
C) First-past-the-post
D) Single transferable vote
Answer: C) Preferential voting
How long is the term of a member of the House of Representatives?

A) 2 years
B) 3 years
C) 4 years
D) 5 years
Answer: B) 3 years
The leader of the majority party in the House of Representatives is known as the:

A) Speaker
B) Prime Minister
C) Governor-General
D) Opposition Leader
Answer: B) Prime Minister
Who has the power to dissolve the House of Representatives?

A) Governor-General
B) Prime Minister
C) Chief Justice
D) Speaker of the House
Answer: A) Governor-General
The Australian House of Representatives is located in:

A) Canberra
B) Sydney
C) Melbourne
D) Brisbane
Answer: A) Canberra
How are members of the House of Representatives elected?

A) By the people directly
B) Appointed by the Senate
C) Chosen by the Prime Minister
D) Through a lottery system
Answer: A) By the people directly
What is the role of the House of Representatives in the Australian Parliament?

A) Reviewing and passing legislation
B) Appointing judges
C) Managing foreign relations
D) Overseeing state governments
Answer: A) Reviewing and passing legislation
Which Australian territory does not have representation in the House of Representatives?

A) Australian Capital Territory (ACT)
B) Northern Territory
C) Christmas Island
D) Norfolk Island
Answer: D) Norfolk Island
What is the quorum required for the House of Representatives to conduct its business?

A) 51 members
B) 76 members
C) 100 members
D) 120 members
Answer: A) 51 members
Who presides over the House of Representatives in the absence of the Speaker?

A) Prime Minister
B) Deputy Speaker
C) Clerk of the House
D) Opposition Leader
Answer: B) Deputy Speaker
Which term is used for a proposed law in the House of Representatives?

A) Bill
B) Resolution
C) Motion
D) Regulation
Answer: A) Bill
What is the official title of the head of the House of Representatives?

A) President
B) Speaker
C) Chairman
D) Chancellor
Answer: B) Speaker
How many members need to vote in favor of a bill for it to pass in the House of Representatives?

A) Majority of present members
B) Two-thirds majority
C) Half of the total members
D) Unanimous vote
Answer: A) Majority of present members
What is the minimum number of members required to form a political party in the House of Representatives?

A) 2 members
B) 5 members
C) 10 members
D) 15 members
Answer: A) 2 members
Who appoints the Clerk of the House of Representatives?

A) Prime Minister
B) Speaker
C) Governor-General
D) Chief Justice
Answer: B) Speaker
In the House of Representatives, what is a “dissenting member” referring to?

A) A member with a different political ideology
B) A member who votes against their party
C) A member who does not attend sessions regularly
D) A member without party affiliation
Answer: B) A member who votes against their party
What happens if a bill is rejected by the House of Representatives?

A) It goes to the Senate for reconsideration
B) It is sent for a public referendum
C) It automatically becomes law after a certain period
D) It requires the Governor-General’s approval
Answer: A) It goes to the Senate for reconsideration
What is the ceremonial mace in the House of Representatives used for?

A) Calling for order during debates
B) Indicating the sitting of the House
C) Signifying the authority of the Speaker
D) Symbolizing the power of the Prime Minister
Answer: C) Signifying the authority of the Speaker
Which committee examines the government’s budget in the House of Representatives?

A) Public Accounts Committee
B) Budget Review Committee
C) Finance and Public Administration Committee
D) Appropriations Committee
Answer: D) Appropriations Committee
What is the term for a member who serves in the House of Representatives but does not belong to any political party?

A) Independent member
B) Neutral member
C) Non-affiliated member
D) Non-partisan member
Answer: A) Independent member
What is the maximum term limit for a member of the House of Representatives?

A) 3 terms
B) 4 terms
C) 5 terms
D) No term limits
Answer: D) No term limits
Which document outlines the rules and procedures of the House of Representatives?

A) Constitution
B) Magna Carta
C) Standing Orders
D) Parliamentary Acts
Answer: C) Standing Orders
The House of Representatives can initiate impeachment proceedings against:

A) The Prime Minister
B) Senators
C) Judges of the High Court
D) The Governor-General
Answer: C) Judges of the High Court
What is the minimum number of members required for a political party to be recognized as an official party in the House of Representatives?

A) 3 members
B) 5 members
C) 7 members
D) 10 members
Answer: B) 5 members
Which parliamentary officer advises the House of Representatives on legislative procedures and rules?

A) Clerk
B) Speaker
C) Sergeant-at-Arms
D) Whip
Answer: A) Clerk
What is the role of the Deputy Speaker in the House of Representatives?

A) Representing the opposition party
B) Assisting the Speaker in managing proceedings
C) Leading the government’s legislative agenda
D) Conducting inquiries into government departments
Answer: B) Assisting the Speaker in managing proceedings
How often does the House of Representatives usually sit for sessions?

A) Daily
B) Weekly
C) Fortnightly
D) As needed
Answer: D) As needed
Which body does the House of Representatives share legislative power with in the Australian Parliament?

A) Senate
B) Governor-General
C) High Court
D) Executive Council
Answer: A) Senate
Who determines the election dates for the House of Representatives?

A) Prime Minister
B) Governor-General
C) Chief Electoral Officer
D) Speaker of the House
Answer: B) Governor-General
What is the role of the Whips in the House of Representatives?

A) Enforcing party discipline and attendance
B) Assisting in drafting bills
C) Overseeing foreign affairs committees
D) Appointing committee members
Answer: A) Enforcing party discipline and attendance
The Speaker of the House of Representatives is elected by:

A) The Prime Minister
B) The Governor-General
C) Members of the House
D) The Chief Justice
Answer: C) Members of the House
Which type of motion can end a debate and proceed to a vote in the House of Representatives?

A) Adjournment motion
B) Closure motion
C) Substantive motion
D) Disallowance motion
Answer: B) Closure motion
How are vacant seats in the House of Representatives filled between elections?

A) By-elections
B) Appointment by the Prime Minister
C) Random selection from eligible candidates
D) No filling until the next election
Answer: A) By-elections
What is the name of the official record of the House of Representatives’ proceedings?

A) Parliamentary Gazette
B) Journal of Proceedings
C) Hansard
D) Parliamentary Chronicle
Answer: C) Hansard

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