Australian Parliament MCQs with Answer

What is the name of the upper house of the Australian Parliament?

a) House of Representatives
b) Senate
c) National Assembly
d) Legislative Council
Answer: b) Senate
How many senators represent each Australian state in the Senate?

a) 5
b) 10
c) 12
d) It varies for each state
Answer: c) 12
Who is the head of the Australian Government?

a) President
b) Prime Minister
c) Governor-General
d) Speaker of the House
Answer: b) Prime Minister
Which Australian city houses the Parliament House?

a) Melbourne
b) Canberra
c) Sydney
d) Brisbane
Answer: b) Canberra
How often are federal elections held in Australia for the House of Representatives?

a) Every 2 years
b) Every 3 years
c) Every 4 years
d) Every 5 years
Answer: b) Every 3 years
What is the term length for a senator in the Australian Parliament?

a) 2 years
b) 3 years
c) 4 years
d) 6 years
Answer: d) 6 years
Which political party traditionally aligns with a red rose as its symbol in Australian politics?

a) Liberal Party
b) National Party
c) Australian Labor Party
d) Greens Party
Answer: c) Australian Labor Party
What is the minimum voting age for federal elections in Australia?

a) 16
b) 17
c) 18
d) 21
Answer: c) 18
Who represents the Queen of Australia in the Parliament?

a) Prime Minister
b) Governor-General
c) Speaker of the House
d) Leader of the Opposition
Answer: b) Governor-General
What is the minimum age requirement to be elected to the House of Representatives?

a) 18
b) 21
c) 25
d) 30
Answer: a) 18
In which year did the first federal Parliament of Australia sit?

a) 1890
b) 1901
c) 1910
d) 1920
Answer: b) 1901
Who is the presiding officer in the Senate?

a) Prime Minister
b) Speaker
c) President of the Senate
d) Deputy Prime Minister
Answer: c) President of the Senate
Which Australian political party is known for its focus on environmental issues?

a) National Party
b) Greens Party
c) Liberal Party
d) Labor Party
Answer: b) Greens Party
Who has the power to dissolve the House of Representatives?

a) Prime Minister
b) Governor-General
c) Speaker of the House
d) President of the Senate
Answer: b) Governor-General
What is the maximum number of members that the House of Representatives can have?

a) 100
b) 150
c) 200
d) 250
Answer: b) 150
What is the official residence of the Prime Minister of Australia called?

a) Kirribilli House
b) Government House
c) The Lodge
d) Admiralty House
Answer: c) The Lodge
Who is responsible for proposing most of the government’s laws in the Parliament?

a) Leader of the Opposition
b) Prime Minister
c) Speaker of the House
d) Attorney-General
Answer: b) Prime Minister
Which term refers to the power of the Australian Senate to reject legislation proposed by the House of Representatives?

a) Royal Assent
b) Double Dissolution
c) Senate Veto
d) Senate’s Blocking Power
Answer: d) Senate’s Blocking Power
How many divisions or electorates are there for the House of Representatives?

a) 100
b) 125
c) 150
d) 200
Answer: c) 150
What is the term length for the Governor-General of Australia?

a) 2 years
b) 3 years
c) 4 years
d) 5 years
Answer: d) 5 years
Who appoints the Governor-General of Australia?

a) Prime Minister
b) Queen of Australia
c) President of the Senate
d) High Court Judges
Answer: b) Queen of Australia
Which Australian state has the most senators representing it in the Senate?

a) New South Wales
b) Victoria
c) Queensland
d) Western Australia
Answer: a) New South Wales
Which party won the first federal election in Australia in 1901?

a) Australian Labor Party
b) Liberal Party
c) Protectionist Party
d) Free Trade Party
Answer: c) Protectionist Party
What is the role of the Speaker of the House of Representatives?

a) Represents the Queen in the House
b) Acts as the head of the government
c) Presides over debates in the House
d) Leads the opposition in the House
Answer: c) Presides over debates in the House
What is the term used for the process by which members of Parliament can vote according to their own conscience rather than along party lines?

a) Free Vote
b) Party Whip
c) Conscience Vote
d) Independent Vote
Answer: c) Conscience Vote
What is the main function of the Joint Standing Committees in the Australian Parliament?

a) To oversee the work of the Prime Minister
b) To resolve disputes between the House and the Senate
c) To examine specific issues and report back to Parliament
d) To propose amendments to the Constitution
Answer: c) To examine specific issues and report back to Parliament
How many territories in Australia are represented in the Parliament?

a) 1
b) 2
c) 3
d) 4
Answer: b) 2
Which is the longest-serving Australian Prime Minister to date?

a) Bob Hawke
b) John Howard
c) Malcolm Fraser
d) Robert Menzies
Answer: d) Robert Menzies
Who has the authority to call a double dissolution election in Australia?

a) Prime Minister
b) Governor-General
c) Speaker of the House
d) President of the Senate
Answer: b) Governor-General
What is the name of the process used to remove a Prime Minister from office within a political party?

a) Vote of No Confidence
b) Impeachment
c) Spill Motion
d) Leadership Challenge
Answer: d) Leadership Challenge
Who is the leader of the Australian Senate when the position of President of the Senate is vacant?

a) Prime Minister
b) Deputy Prime Minister
c) Leader of the Government in the Senate
d) Governor-General
Answer: c) Leader of the Government in the Senate
What is the role of the High Court in relation to the Australian Parliament?

a) Interpreting and applying the Constitution
b) Passing legislation
c) Appointing senators
d) Advising the Prime Minister
Answer: a) Interpreting and applying the Constitution
Which term refers to the power of the Governor-General to refuse assent to a bill passed by Parliament?

a) Veto
b) Dissolution
c) Reserve Powers
d) Royal Assent
Answer: d) Royal Assent
Which House of the Australian Parliament initiates money bills?

a) House of Representatives
b) Senate
c) Both houses jointly
d) Governor-General
Answer: a) House of Representatives
What is the role of the Clerk of the House of Representatives?

a) Presiding officer in the House
b) Chief administrative officer
c) Leader of the Government in the House
d) Chief Whip
Answer: b) Chief administrative officer
How many votes are required in both houses to override a veto by the Governor-General?

a) Simple Majority
b) Two-thirds Majority
c) Three-quarters Majority
d) Unanimous Vote
Answer: b) Two-thirds Majority
What is the term used for the members of Parliament who do not belong to any political party?

a) Independents
b) Unaffiliated Members
c) Non-Partisans
d) Free Agents
Answer: a) Independents
Who becomes the acting Prime Minister if the Prime Minister is temporarily unavailable or absent?

a) Deputy Prime Minister
b) Speaker of the House
c) Governor-General
d) Leader of the Opposition
Answer: a) Deputy Prime Minister
Which house of the Australian Parliament can introduce bills related to taxation?

a) House of Representatives
b) Senate
c) Both houses jointly
d) Prime Minister’s Office
Answer: a) House of Representatives
What is the term used for the formal process of ending a session of Parliament?

a) Adjournment
b) Prorogation
c) Recess
d) Dissolution
Answer: b) Prorogation

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