Australian Political System MCQs with Answer

Who is the head of state in Australia?
A) Prime Minister
B) Governor-General
C) Speaker of the House
D) Chief Justice
Answer: B) Governor-General

The Australian Parliament consists of how many houses?
A) One
B) Two
C) Three
D) Four
Answer: B) Two

The Senate is made up of how many senators from each state and territory?
A) 10 from each state, 2 from each territory
B) 12 from each state, 1 from each territory
C) 6 from each state, 2 from each territory
D) 5 from each state, 3 from each territory
Answer: A) 12 from each state, 2 from each territory

What is the maximum term of a member of the House of Representatives?
A) 4 years
B) 5 years
C) 6 years
D) 3 years
Answer: D) 3 years

The party or coalition with the majority of seats in the House of Representatives forms the:
A) Government
B) Opposition
C) Senate Committee
D) High Court
Answer: A) Government

Who is the current Prime Minister of Australia (as of 2023)?
A) Scott Morrison
B) Tony Abbott
C) Malcolm Turnbull
D) Kevin Rudd
Answer: A) Scott Morrison

The Australian Labor Party (ALP) is generally associated with which political ideology?
A) Liberalism
B) Conservatism
C) Socialism
D) Libertarianism
Answer: C) Socialism

Which Australian political party traditionally focuses on conservative values and policies?
A) Australian Greens
B) Liberal Party of Australia
C) Australian Democrats
D) One Nation Party
Answer: B) Liberal Party of Australia

The Australian Greens party is known for advocating:
A) Environmentalism and social justice
B) Free-market capitalism
C) Strong immigration policies
D) Monarchy restoration
Answer: A) Environmentalism and social justice

Which house of the Australian Parliament is known for its proportional representation system?
A) House of Representatives
B) Senate
C) Both have proportional representation
D) None of the above
Answer: B) Senate

The term ‘hung parliament’ refers to:
A) A parliament without a prime minister
B) A parliament where no party or coalition has a majority
C) A parliament with an equal number of men and women members
D) A parliament with a high rate of absenteeism
Answer: B) A parliament where no party or coalition has a majority

What is the minimum voting age in federal elections in Australia?
A) 18
B) 16
C) 21
D) 25
Answer: A) 18

The role of the Speaker of the House of Representatives is to:
A) Represent the monarch’s interests
B) Chair parliamentary sessions and maintain order
C) Lead the opposition party
D) Manage foreign affairs
Answer: B) Chair parliamentary sessions and maintain order

The Constitution of Australia came into effect in which year?
A) 1899
B) 1901
C) 1911
D) 1920
Answer: B) 1901

Which branch of government is responsible for interpreting laws and administering justice in Australia?
A) Executive
B) Legislative
C) Judicial
D) Administrative
Answer: C) Judicial

The term “no confidence motion” is related to:
A) Removing the Speaker of the House
B) Dissolving the Parliament
C) Expressing lack of support for the government
D) Electing a new Prime Minister
Answer: C) Expressing lack of support for the government

The Senate has the power to:
A) Ratify international treaties
B) Appoint the Prime Minister
C) Pass the federal budget
D) Declare war
Answer: A) Ratify international treaties

The Australian Capital Territory (ACT) is represented by how many senators?
A) 4
B) 2
C) 6
D) 3
Answer: B) 2

What is a referendum in the Australian context?
A) A vote to elect local government officials
B) A vote by the Parliament to amend the Constitution
C) A vote by the people to approve or reject a proposed law or amendment
D) A vote to remove a sitting Prime Minister
Answer: C) A vote by the people to approve or reject a proposed law or amendment

The concept of “separation of powers” in Australia refers to the:
A) Division of powers between federal and state governments
B) Independence of the judiciary, legislature, and executive branches
C) Division of powers between the House of Representatives and the Senate
D) Role of the monarch in the political system
Answer: B) Independence of the judiciary, legislature, and executive branches

The term “double dissolution” refers to:
A) Dissolving both houses of Parliament simultaneously
B) A situation where two parties form a coalition government
C) A situation where the Prime Minister resigns twice in a row
D) An electoral process where citizens vote twice
Answer: A) Dissolving both houses of Parliament simultaneously

What is the title of the head of an Australian state government?
A) Governor
B) Premier
C) Mayor
D) Chief Minister
Answer: B) Premier

The High Court of Australia has how many justices?
A) 5
B) 7
C) 9
D) 11
Answer: C) 9

The Reserve Powers of the Governor-General include:
A) Signing international treaties
B) Declaring war
C) Dissolving Parliament
D) Appointing the Prime Minister
Answer: B) Declaring war

Which Australian territory does not have representation in the Senate?
A) Northern Territory
B) Australian Capital Territory (ACT)
C) Christmas Island
D) Norfolk Island
Answer: D) Norfolk Island

The House of Representatives is also known as:
A) The Lower House
B) The Upper House
C) The House of Commons
D) The House of Lords
Answer: A) The Lower House

What is the purpose of a by-election in Australia?
A) To elect state governors
B) To elect local council members
C) To fill a vacant seat in Parliament between general elections
D) To amend the Constitution
Answer: C) To fill a vacant seat in Parliament between general elections

The term “federalism” in Australia refers to:
A) A system of government where power is divided between federal and state levels
B) A system where power is centralized in the federal government only
C) A system with a single ruling party
D) A system where the Prime Minister has ultimate authority
Answer: A) A system of government where power is divided between federal and state levels

Which Australian political party advocates for the interests of rural and regional areas?
A) Australian Labor Party (ALP)
B) Liberal Party of Australia
C) National Party of Australia
D) Australian Greens
Answer: C) National Party of Australia

The doctrine of “responsible government” implies:
A) The government is accountable to the monarch only
B) The government is accountable to the Parliament
C) The government is not accountable to anyone
D) The government is accountable to the judiciary
Answer: B) The government is accountable to the Parliament

The Privy Council was Australia’s highest court of appeal until:
A) 1901
B) 1945
C) 1967
D) 1986
Answer: D) 1986

The process of redrawing electoral boundaries to reflect changes in population is known as:
A) Gentrification
B) Redistribution
C) Annexation
D) Gerrymandering
Answer: B) Redistribution

What is the term used for the formal process by which a bill becomes law in Australia?
A) Assent
B) Royal Approval
C) Proclamation
D) Enactment
Answer: A) Assent

The political term “coalition” refers to:
A) A meeting of political leaders
B) A merger of two or more political parties to form a government
C) A group of independent politicians
D) A process of drafting new legislation
Answer: B) A merger of two or more political parties to form a government

The Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) is responsible for:
A) Conducting federal and state elections and referendums
B) Advising the Prime Minister on policy matters
C) Managing international relations
D) Enforcing immigration laws
Answer: A) Conducting federal and state elections and referendums

In Australia, a writ is:
A) A document issued by a court to summon a person to appear in court
B) A legal order to dissolve Parliament
C) A ceremonial document signed by the Governor-General
D) A parliamentary committee report
Answer: A) A document issued by a court to summon a person to appear in court

The term “shadow cabinet” refers to:
A) A group of ministers in the Senate
B) A group of senior opposition party members who mirror the roles of the government’s cabinet
C) A secret government committee
D) A committee responsible for drafting new legislation
Answer: B) A group of senior opposition party members who mirror the roles of the government’s cabinet

The Australian flag consists of:
A) The Union Jack and six stars representing the states
B) The Union Jack and the Southern Cross constellation
C) The Southern Cross constellation and the Australian continent
D) The Union Jack and the kangaroo emblem
Answer: B) The Union Jack and the Southern Cross constellation

The term “crossbenchers” in Australian politics refers to:
A) Members of the opposition party
B) Senators who vote with the government
C) Independent or minor party members who are not part of the government or opposition
D) Committee chairs in the House of Representatives
Answer: C) Independent or minor party members who are not part of the government or opposition

Which of the following is NOT a function of the Governor-General in Australia?
A) Granting Royal Assent to bills passed by Parliament
B) Declaring war
C) Appointing the Prime Minister
D) Introducing new legislation in Parliament
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