Canadian Confederation Era MCQs with Answer

The Canadian Confederation officially took place in which year?
a) 1867
b) 1776
c) 1812
d) 1840
Answer: a) 1867

The “Father of Confederation” who played a key role in the creation of Canada was:
a) Louis Riel
b) John A. Macdonald
c) Louis-Joseph Papineau
d) William Lyon Mackenzie
Answer: b) John A. Macdonald

The Charlottetown Conference of 1864 was a significant event in the lead-up to Confederation because:
a) It resulted in the drafting of the British North America Act
b) It established the Dominion of Canada
c) It brought together delegates to discuss the possibility of union
d) It marked the end of British colonial rule in Canada
Answer: c) It brought together delegates to discuss the possibility of union

The British North America Act, 1867, established the Dominion of Canada by uniting which provinces?
a) Nova Scotia and New Brunswick
b) Upper Canada and Lower Canada
c) British Columbia and Manitoba
d) Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland
Answer: b) Upper Canada and Lower Canada

The “Great Coalition” brought together political leaders who advocated for:
a) The continuation of British colonial rule
b) Religious freedom in Canada
c) Political reform and Confederation
d) Indigenous sovereignty
Answer: c) Political reform and Confederation

The province of British Columbia joined Confederation in:
a) 1867
b) 1870
c) 1885
d) 1905
Answer: b) 1870

The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) played a significant role in Confederation by:
a) Establishing trade routes with Asia
b) Connecting Canada from coast to coast
c) Promoting religious freedom
d) Strengthening ties with Europe
Answer: b) Connecting Canada from coast to coast

The “National Policy” implemented by Sir John A. Macdonald aimed to:
a) Promote Indigenous self-governance
b) Strengthen ties with the United States
c) Protect Canadian industries and encourage economic growth
d) Abolish the monarchy in Canada
Answer: c) Protect Canadian industries and encourage economic growth

The “Rupert’s Land and North-Western Territory Order” of 1869 had significant implications for Confederation because it:
a) Annexed American territories to Canada
b) Acquired Indigenous lands for Canadian settlement
c) Divided Canada into separate provinces
d) Established diplomatic relations with European powers
Answer: b) Acquired Indigenous lands for Canadian settlement

The “Manitoba Act” of 1870 established the province of Manitoba and addressed the rights of which Indigenous group?
a) Mi’kmaq
b) Haida
c) Métis
d) Inuit
Answer: c) Métis

The “Numbered Treaties” negotiated in the late 19th and early 20th centuries aimed to:
a) Establish trade agreements with European powers
b) Recognize Indigenous sovereignty and self-governance
c) Encourage Indigenous assimilation into Canadian society
d) Secure Indigenous rights to land and resources
Answer: d) Secure Indigenous rights to land and resources

The “Pacific Scandal” of 1873 had a significant impact on Confederation by:
a) Leading to the resignation of Prime Minister John A. Macdonald
b) Strengthening ties with the United States
c) Accelerating the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway
d) Promoting religious tolerance
Answer: a) Leading to the resignation of Prime Minister John A. Macdonald

The “Dominion Lands Act” of 1872 promoted:
a) Religious education in Canadian schools
b) Agricultural settlement and westward expansion in Canada
c) Indigenous land rights and sovereignty
d) The construction of railways in Canada
Answer: b) Agricultural settlement and westward expansion in Canada

The “North-West Rebellion” of 1885 was primarily associated with which region of Canada?
a) Atlantic Canada
b) Prairie provinces
c) West Coast
d) Maritime provinces
Answer: b) Prairie provinces

The “National Policy” implemented by Sir John A. Macdonald aimed to:
a) Promote Indigenous self-governance
b) Strengthen ties with the United States
c) Protect Canadian industries and encourage economic growth
d) Abolish the monarchy in Canada
Answer: c) Protect Canadian industries and encourage economic growth

The “Rupert’s Land and North-Western Territory Order” of 1869 had significant implications for Confederation because it:
a) Annexed American territories to Canada
b) Acquired Indigenous lands for Canadian settlement
c) Divided Canada into separate provinces
d) Established diplomatic relations with European powers
Answer: b) Acquired Indigenous lands for Canadian settlement

The “Manitoba Act” of 1870 established the province of Manitoba and addressed the rights of which Indigenous group?
a) Mi’kmaq
b) Haida
c) Métis
d) Inuit
Answer: c) Métis

The “Numbered Treaties” negotiated in the late 19th and early 20th centuries aimed to:
a) Establish trade agreements with European powers
b) Recognize Indigenous sovereignty and self-governance
c) Encourage Indigenous assimilation into Canadian society
d) Secure Indigenous rights to land and resources
Answer: d) Secure Indigenous rights to land and resources

The “Pacific Scandal” of 1873 had a significant impact on Confederation by:
a) Leading to the resignation of Prime Minister John A. Macdonald
b) Strengthening ties with the United States
c) Accelerating the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway
d) Promoting religious tolerance
Answer: a) Leading to the resignation of Prime Minister John A. Macdonald

The “Louis Riel” led the “North-West Rebellion” against the Canadian government in protest of:
a) The expansion of British rule
b) The introduction of British taxes
c) The lack of Indigenous representation in government
d) The mistreatment of Métis and Indigenous peoples
Answer: d) The mistreatment of Métis and Indigenous peoples

The “Statute of Westminster” of 1931 granted Canada:
a) Full independence from Britain
b) Membership in the European Union
c) Control over British foreign policy
d) A seat on the United Nations Security Council
Answer: a) Full independence from Britain

The “Persons Case” of 1929 was a significant legal milestone because it:
a) Established the rights of Indigenous peoples
b) Recognized the contributions of women to Canadian society
c) Protected the rights of religious minorities
d) Challenged the authority of the Canadian government
Answer: b) Recognized the contributions of women to Canadian society

The “Chanak Crisis” of 1922 marked a turning point in Canada’s foreign policy by:
a) Establishing close ties with the United States
b) Emphasizing Canada’s ties to the British Empire
c) Withdrawing from international diplomacy
d) Pursuing an isolationist stance
Answer: b) Emphasizing Canada’s ties to the British Empire

The “Halibut Treaty” of 1923 was significant because it was:
a) The first treaty signed by Canada as an independent nation
b) A trade agreement between Canada and the United States
c) An alliance between Canada and Indigenous nations
d) A military treaty with European powers
Answer: a) The first treaty signed by Canada as an independent nation

The “Royal Visit of 1939” had symbolic importance for Canada as it:
a) Marked the beginning of Canada’s involvement in World War II
b) Celebrated the opening of a new railway
c) Strengthened ties between Canada and the United States
d) Recognized the importance of the fur trade
Answer: a) Marked the beginning of Canada’s involvement in World War II

The “Dominion Lands Act” of 1872 promoted:
a) Religious education in Canadian schools
b) Agricultural settlement and westward expansion in Canada
c) Indigenous land rights and sovereignty
d) The construction of railways in Canada
Answer: b) Agricultural settlement and westward expansion in Canada

The “North-West Rebellion” of 1885 was primarily associated with which region of Canada?
a) Atlantic Canada
b) Prairie provinces
c) West Coast
d) Maritime provinces
Answer: b) Prairie provinces

The “National Policy” implemented by Sir John A. Macdonald aimed to:
a) Promote Indigenous self-governance
b) Strengthen ties with the United States
c) Protect Canadian industries and encourage economic growth
d) Abolish the monarchy in Canada
Answer: c) Protect Canadian industries and encourage economic growth

The “Rupert’s Land and North-Western Territory Order” of 1869 had significant implications for Confederation because it:
a) Annexed American territories to Canada
b) Acquired Indigenous lands for Canadian settlement
c) Divided Canada into separate provinces
d) Established diplomatic relations with European powers
Answer: b) Acquired Indigenous lands for Canadian settlement

The “Manitoba Act” of 1870 established the province of Manitoba and addressed the rights of which Indigenous group?
a) Mi’kmaq
b) Haida
c) Métis
d) Inuit
Answer: c) Métis

The “Numbered Treaties” negotiated in the late 19th and early 20th centuries aimed to:
a) Establish trade agreements with European powers
b) Recognize Indigenous sovereignty and self-governance
c) Encourage Indigenous assimilation into Canadian society
d) Secure Indigenous rights to land and resources
Answer: d) Secure Indigenous rights to land and resources

The “Pacific Scandal” of 1873 had a significant impact on Confederation by:
a) Leading to the resignation of Prime Minister John A. Macdonald
b) Strengthening ties with the United States
c) Accelerating the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway
d) Promoting religious tolerance
Answer: a) Leading to the resignation of Prime Minister John A. Macdonald

The “Louis Riel” led the “North-West Rebellion” against the Canadian government in protest of:
a) The expansion of British rule
b) The introduction of British taxes
c) The lack of Indigenous representation in government
d) The mistreatment of Métis and Indigenous peoples
Answer: d) The mistreatment of Métis and Indigenous peoples

The “Statute of Westminster” of 1931 granted Canada:
a) Full independence from Britain
b) Membership in the European Union
c) Control over British foreign policy
d) A seat on the United Nations Security Council
Answer: a) Full independence from Britain

The “Persons Case” of 1929 was a significant legal milestone because it:
a) Established the rights of Indigenous peoples
b) Recognized the contributions of women to Canadian society
c) Protected the rights of religious minorities
d) Challenged the authority of the Canadian government
Answer: b) Recognized the contributions of women to Canadian society

The “Chanak Crisis” of 1922 marked a turning point in Canada’s foreign policy by:
a) Establishing close ties with the United States
b) Emphasizing Canada’s ties to the British Empire
c) Withdrawing from international diplomacy
d) Pursuing an isolationist stance
Answer: b) Emphasizing Canada’s ties to the British Empire

The “Halibut Treaty” of 1923 was significant because it was:
a) The first treaty signed by Canada as an independent nation
b) A trade agreement between Canada and the United States
c) An alliance between Canada and Indigenous nations
d) A military treaty with European powers
Answer: a) The first treaty signed by Canada as an independent nation

The “Royal Visit of 1939” had symbolic importance for Canada as it:
a) Marked the beginning of Canada’s involvement in World War II
b) Celebrated the opening of a new railway
c) Strengthened ties between Canada and the United States
d) Recognized the importance of the fur trade
Answer: a) Marked the beginning of Canada’s involvement in World War II

The “Dominion Lands Act” of 1872 promoted:
a) Religious education in Canadian schools
b) Agricultural settlement and westward expansion in Canada
c) Indigenous land rights and sovereignty
d) The construction of railways in Canada
Answer: b) Agricultural settlement and westward expansion in Canada

The “North-West Rebellion” of 1885 was primarily associated with which region of Canada?
a) Atlantic Canada
b) Prairie provinces
c) West Coast
d) Maritime provinces
Answer: b) Prairie provinces

The “National Policy” implemented by Sir John A. Macdonald aimed to:
a) Promote Indigenous self-governance
b) Strengthen ties with the United States
c) Protect Canadian industries and encourage economic growth
d) Abolish the monarchy in Canada
Answer: c) Protect Canadian industries and encourage economic growth

The “Rupert’s Land and North-Western Territory Order” of 1869 had significant implications for Confederation because it:
a) Annexed American territories to Canada
b) Acquired Indigenous lands for Canadian settlement
c) Divided Canada into separate provinces
d) Established diplomatic relations with European powers
Answer: b) Acquired Indigenous lands for Canadian settlement

The “Manitoba Act” of 1870 established the province of Manitoba and addressed the rights of which Indigenous group?
a) Mi’kmaq
b) Haida
c) Métis
d) Inuit
Answer: c) Métis

The “Numbered Treaties” negotiated in the late 19th and early 20th centuries aimed to:
a) Establish trade agreements with European powers
b) Recognize Indigenous sovereignty and self-governance
c) Encourage Indigenous assimilation into Canadian society
d) Secure Indigenous rights to land and resources
Answer: d) Secure Indigenous rights to land and resources

The “Pacific Scandal” of 1873 had a significant impact on Confederation by:
a) Leading to the resignation of Prime Minister John A. Macdonald
b) Strengthening ties with the United States
c) Accelerating the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway
d) Promoting religious tolerance
Answer: a) Leading to the resignation of Prime Minister John A. Macdonald

The “Louis Riel” led the “North-West Rebellion” against the Canadian government in protest of:
a) The expansion of British rule
b) The introduction of British taxes
c) The lack of Indigenous representation in government
d) The mistreatment of Métis and Indigenous peoples
Answer: d) The mistreatment of Métis and Indigenous peoples

The “Statute of Westminster” of 1931 granted Canada:
a) Full independence from Britain
b) Membership in the European Union
c) Control over British foreign policy
d) A seat on the United Nations Security Council
Answer: a) Full independence from Britain

The “Persons Case” of 1929 was a significant legal milestone because it:
a) Established the rights of Indigenous peoples
b) Recognized the contributions of women to Canadian society
c) Protected the rights of religious minorities
d) Challenged the authority of the Canadian government
Answer: b) Recognized the contributions of women to Canadian society

The “Chanak Crisis” of 1922 marked a turning point in Canada’s foreign policy by:
a) Establishing close ties with the United States
b) Emphasizing Canada’s ties to the British Empire
c) Withdrawing from international diplomacy
d) Pursuing an isolationist stance
Answer: b) Emphasizing Canada’s ties to the British Empire

The “Halibut Treaty” of 1923 was significant because it was:
a) The first treaty signed by Canada as an independent nation
b) A trade agreement between Canada and the United States
c) An alliance between Canada and Indigenous nations
d) A military treaty with European powers
Answer: a) The first treaty signed by Canada as an independent nation

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