Canadian Elections MCQs With Answer

How often are federal elections held in Canada?
a) Every 2 years
b) Every 4 years
c) Every 5 years
d) Whenever the Prime Minister decides
Answer: b

What is the minimum voting age in federal elections in Canada?
a) 16 years
b) 18 years
c) 21 years
d) 25 years
Answer: b

Who is responsible for setting the date of federal elections in Canada?
a) Prime Minister
b) Governor General
c) Chief Electoral Officer
d) Speaker of the House of Commons
Answer: a

In Canada, what term is commonly used for a constituency or geographic area where voters elect a Member of Parliament (MP)?
a) County
b) District
c) Ward
d) Riding
Answer: d

What is the term for the practice of trying to influence the way people vote by providing information or making arguments?
a) Advocacy
b) Lobbying
c) Polling
d) Campaigning
Answer: d

How is the Prime Minister determined in a federal election?
a) By the Governor General
b) By the political party with the most seats in the House of Commons
c) By a national popular vote
d) By the Senate
Answer: b

What is the term for the period of time between the dissolution of Parliament and the election day?
a) Campaign period
b) Transition period
c) Pre-election period
d) Writ period
Answer: d

Which government agency is responsible for overseeing federal elections in Canada?
a) Elections Canada
b) Canadian Election Commission
c) Federal Election Authority
d) Electoral Oversight Bureau
Answer: a

What is a by-election?
a) An election that occurs every two years
b) An election that takes place between general elections to fill a vacant seat
c) An election held only in rural areas
d) An election for local government positions
Answer: b

Which electoral system does Canada primarily use for federal elections?
a) First-past-the-post
b) Proportional representation
c) Single transferable vote
d) Mixed-member proportional
Answer: a

What is the “writ” in the context of Canadian elections?
a) A formal proclamation announcing an election
b) A document that certifies voter registration
c) A report on the state of the economy
d) A letter from the Prime Minister to the Governor General
Answer: a

How is the number of seats in the House of Commons determined for each province and territory?
a) By the population of the province or territory
b) By the number of registered voters
c) By the number of candidates running
d) By the geographic size of the province or territory
Answer: a

In a federal election, what is the role of the Returning Officer?
a) To lead the campaign for a political party
b) To oversee the electoral process in a specific riding
c) To serve as a poll worker
d) To supervise the Senate elections
Answer: b

Which level of government is responsible for the administration of federal elections?
a) Federal government
b) Provincial and territorial governments
c) Municipal governments
d) Indigenous governments
Answer: a

What is the purpose of advance voting in Canadian elections?
a) To give politicians extra time for campaigning
b) To accommodate voters who may not be able to vote on election day
c) To allow people to vote multiple times
d) To encourage voter turnout among youth
Answer: b

Which federal election saw the introduction of online voting as an option in select regions?
a) 2000
b) 2004
c) 2008
d) 2015
Answer: c

What is the maximum duration of a federal election campaign in Canada?
a) 30 days
b) 45 days
c) 60 days
d) 75 days
Answer: b

What is the purpose of the Official Agent in an election campaign?
a) To be the spokesperson for the campaign
b) To organize campaign events
c) To oversee financial matters related to the campaign
d) To manage the party leader’s schedule
Answer: c

What is the process of redistributing electoral districts to ensure roughly equal population sizes?
a) Election reform
b) District adjustment
c) Boundary gerrymandering
d) Electoral redistribution
Answer: d

What term is used to describe the period of time between the announcement of election results and the swearing-in of elected officials?
a) Transition period
b) Lame-duck period
c) Pre-election period
d) Electoral interval
Answer: a

Which federal election saw a record voter turnout, often attributed to increased accessibility measures?
a) 2000
b) 2004
c) 2011
d) 2015
Answer: c

What is a referendum in the context of Canadian elections?
a) A vote to recall elected officials
b) A vote on a specific policy issue presented to the public
c) A vote to amend the constitution
d) A vote to elect representatives to the Senate
Answer: b

What is the term for a campaign strategy that aims to win votes from supporters of other parties or undecided voters?
a) Negative campaigning
b) Grassroots campaigning
c) Swing voter strategy
d) Cross-party appeal
Answer: c

Which federal election introduced the concept of televised leaders’ debates?
a) 1957
b) 1963
c) 1979
d) 1988
Answer: b

What is the term for an election campaign strategy that focuses on criticizing opponents rather than promoting one’s own policies?
a) Negative campaigning
b) Positive campaigning
c) Neutral campaigning
d) Bipartisan campaigning
Answer: a

Which federal election allowed Canadian citizens living abroad to vote for the first time?
a) 2000
b) 2004
c) 2011
d) 2015
Answer: d

What is the term for the practice of strategically manipulating electoral district boundaries to benefit a particular party?
a) Electoral fraud
b) Voter suppression
c) Boundary adjustment
d) Gerrymandering
Answer: d

What is the “first past the post” electoral system?
a) A system where the first candidate to submit their nomination wins
b) A system where the first candidate to reach a specific number of votes wins
c) A system where the candidate with the most votes in a riding wins
d) A system where voters rank candidates in order of preference
Answer: c

In Canada, which elections use a secret ballot voting method?
a) Federal elections only
b) Provincial and territorial elections only
c) Federal, provincial, and territorial elections
d) Local municipal elections only
Answer: c

What term is used to describe an election where no candidate receives more votes than any other candidate?
a) Tied election
b) Runoff election
c) Stalemate election
d) Hung parliament
Answer: a

Which federal election saw the highest voter turnout in Canadian history?
a) 1958
b) 1965
c) 1984
d) 1997
Answer: a

What is the term for the event in which a party wins a majority of seats in the House of Commons and forms the government?
a) Electoral victory
b) Majority rule
c) Prime Ministerial ascent
d) Election triumph
Answer: b

In a federal election, what is the role of the Chief Electoral Officer?
a) To manage a political party’s campaign
b) To moderate leaders’ debates
c) To oversee the electoral process and ensure fairness
d) To supervise the Governor General’s role
Answer: c

Which province or territory uses a different electoral system (single transferable vote) for its legislative assembly elections?
a) Quebec
b) Ontario
c) British Columbia
d) Yukon
Answer: d

What is the term for the practice of enticing voters to vote for a particular party or candidate using material incentives?
a) Patronage
b) Clientelism
c) Vote buying
d) Electoral graft
Answer: c

Which federal election introduced the use of voter identification requirements to combat fraud?
a) 2000
b) 2004
c) 2008
d) 2011
Answer: c

What term is used to describe an election where one political party wins more seats than any other party, but not enough for a majority?
a) Hung election
b) Minority government
c) Coalition election
d) Tiebreaker election
Answer: b

Which federal election introduced the concept of advance voting for Canadians abroad?
a) 2000
b) 2004
c) 2011
d) 2015
Answer: c

What is the term for a campaign strategy that aims to rally a party’s core supporters and energize their base?
a) Swing voter strategy
b) Base mobilization
c) Centrist appeal
d) Negative campaigning
Answer: b

In Canada, which type of election is not subject to fixed election dates and can be called by the government at any time?
a) Federal elections
b) Provincial elections
c) By-elections
d) Snap elections
Answer: d

What is the term for the process of counting the votes and determining the winners in an election?
a) Canvassing
b) Tallying
c) Enumeration
d) Tabulation
Answer: d

Which federal election introduced the concept of televised debates between party leaders?
a) 1965
b) 1979
c) 1988
d) 2000
Answer: c

In a federal election, what is the purpose of the party platform?
a) To list the candidates’ biographical information
b) To outline the party’s policies and positions on various issues
c) To highlight the party leader’s accomplishments
d) To announce the party’s campaign slogan
Answer: b

What is the term for a party that has no elected representatives in the legislature?
a) Major party
b) Minority party
c) Independent party
d) Outlier party
Answer: b

Which federal election introduced the concept of preferential voting in ridings with more than two candidates?
a) 1997
b) 2000
c) 2004
d) 2011
Answer: a

What is the term for a political party’s list of candidates who are contesting seats in an election?
a) Nomination list
b) Electoral roll
c) Candidate roster
d) Slate
Answer: d

Which federal election saw the introduction of stricter spending limits for political parties and candidates?
a) 2000
b) 2004
c) 2008
d) 2015
Answer: b

What is the term for the period of time between the dissolution of Parliament and the official start of the campaign period?
a) Pre-election period
b) Nomination period
c) Transition period
d) Quiet period
Answer: a

In Canada, which electoral system uses ranked ballots and allows voters to rank candidates in order of preference?
a) First-past-the-post
b) Proportional representation
c) Single transferable vote
d) Mixed-member proportional
Answer: c

Which federal election allowed Canadian citizens living abroad to vote without a requirement to have been in Canada recently?
a) 2000
b) 2004
c) 2011
d) 2015
Answer: d

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