Canadian Parliament MCQs With Answer

Which body of the Canadian Parliament is responsible for proposing and debating new laws?
a) Senate
b) House of Commons
c) Supreme Court
d) Cabinet
Answer: b

How often are federal elections held in Canada?
a) Every 2 years
b) Every 3 years
c) Every 4 years
d) Every 5 years
Answer: d

The Speaker of the House of Commons is responsible for:
a) Leading the government
b) Representing the Queen in Canada
c) Presiding over debates and maintaining order
d) Advising the Prime Minister
Answer: c

Which political party is currently in power in Canada’s federal government?
a) Conservative Party
b) Liberal Party
c) New Democratic Party (NDP)
d) Green Party
Answer: b

The “Opposition” in the Canadian Parliament refers to:
a) The political party with the most seats in the House of Commons
b) The political party in power
c) All non-elected members of Parliament
d) The political parties that are not in power
Answer: d

The Governor General of Canada is appointed by:
a) The Prime Minister
b) The Queen of Canada
c) The House of Commons
d) The Senate
Answer: b

How many Members of Parliament (MPs) are there in the House of Commons?
a) 100
b) 200
c) 338
d) 500
Answer: c

The Senate of Canada is made up of how many senators?
a) 50
b) 75
c) 105
d) 150
Answer: c

The federal government’s budget is presented by the:
a) Prime Minister
b) Minister of Finance
c) Speaker of the House of Commons
d) Governor General
Answer: b

The Parliament of Canada consists of which two main chambers?
a) House of Commons and Senate
b) House of Lords and House of Commons
c) House of Representatives and Senate
d) House of Commons and Assembly
Answer: a

Which political party is known for its focus on social justice, workers’ rights, and environmental issues?
a) Conservative Party
b) Liberal Party
c) New Democratic Party (NDP)
d) Bloc Québécois
Answer: c

What is the role of the Senate in the legislative process?
a) Initiating and proposing new laws
b) Debating and amending proposed laws
c) Implementing and enforcing laws
d) Approving or rejecting laws passed by the House of Commons
Answer: d

The “Cabinet” in Canada’s federal government is composed of:
a) All Members of Parliament (MPs)
b) All Senators
c) The Prime Minister and selected ministers
d) The Governor General and selected ministers
Answer: c

In the House of Commons, who is responsible for leading the government and making policy decisions?
a) The Speaker
b) The Leader of the Opposition
c) The Prime Minister
d) The Governor General
Answer: c

How is the Speaker of the House of Commons selected?
a) Elected by Members of Parliament
b) Appointed by the Prime Minister
c) Chosen by the Governor General
d) Selected by the Senate
Answer: a

What is the primary role of the Official Opposition in the Canadian Parliament?
a) To propose new laws
b) To represent the Crown
c) To criticize the government and offer alternatives
d) To oversee the Senate
Answer: c

The federal government’s power to create and implement laws related to criminal justice falls under which area of jurisdiction?
a) Provincial law
b) Civil law
c) Territorial law
d) Federal law
Answer: d

The term “backbencher” refers to:
a) A Member of Parliament who represents a riding
b) A Member of Parliament from the governing party who holds a ministerial position
c) A Member of Parliament who is not a cabinet minister or party leader
d) A Member of Parliament who sits in the front row during sessions
Answer: c

The “Leader of the Opposition” is usually the leader of:
a) The second-largest party in the House of Commons
b) The party with the most seats in the House of Commons
c) The third-largest party in the House of Commons
d) The party with the fewest seats in the House of Commons
Answer: a

What term is used to describe the official approval of a bill by the Governor General?
a) Royal Assent
b) Executive Approval
c) Presidential Consent
d) Legislative Confirmation
Answer: a

What is the role of the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO)?
a) To draft new laws
b) To manage government finances
c) To provide legal advice to the Prime Minister
d) To support the Prime Minister in carrying out duties
Answer: d

The “First Reading” of a bill in the Canadian Parliament involves:
a) Debating the bill’s details
b) Voting on whether to approve the bill
c) Introducing the bill and stating its purpose
d) Amending the bill’s content
Answer: c

The “Shadow Cabinet” in Canada refers to:
a) Cabinet ministers who work in secret
b) Cabinet ministers from the governing party
c) Ministers who have opposing views to the government’s policies
d) Cabinet ministers who handle foreign affairs
Answer: c

Which term describes the process of questioning government ministers and holding them accountable for their actions in the House of Commons?
a) Cross-examination
b) Scrutiny
c) Interrogation
d) Accountability session
Answer: b

The Senate of Canada is often referred to as the “upper house” because:
a) Senators have more power than Members of Parliament
b) Senators sit in the upper gallery during debates
c) Senators are elected by a higher voting age
d) The Senate reviews and revises bills passed by the House of Commons
Answer: d

Which term refers to the process of a bill being reviewed, debated, and amended in committee before it returns to the full House of Commons for further consideration?
a) First Reading
b) Second Reading
c) Committee Stage
d) Royal Assent
Answer: c

The practice of “whipping” in the Canadian Parliament refers to:
a) Distributing snacks to members during sessions
b) Using party discipline to ensure members vote along party lines
c) Having members of the public attend parliamentary sessions
d) Assigning roles to Members of Parliament based on their expertise
Answer: b

In the Senate, who is responsible for presiding over debates and maintaining order?
a) The Speaker of the House of Commons
b) The Prime Minister
c) The Leader of the Opposition
d) The Speaker of the Senate
Answer: d

Which term describes a bill that has passed both the House of Commons and the Senate and received royal assent?
a) Pending bill
b) Proposed bill
c) Statute law
d) Draft bill
Answer: c

How often does the Canadian Parliament typically meet for sessions?
a) Weekly
b) Monthly
c) Twice a year
d) As needed
Answer: d

What is the term for the official written request by the government to the Governor General for funding and authority to spend public funds?
a) Budget proposal
b) Spending plan
c) Appropriation bill
d) Fiscal request
Answer: c

In the Canadian Parliament, what term is used to describe the process of debating a bill’s overall principles and goals?
a) First Reading
b) Second Reading
c) Committee Stage
d) Third Reading
Answer: b

The “Oath of Allegiance” taken by Members of Parliament requires them to swear loyalty to:
a) The Prime Minister
b) The Queen of Canada
c) The Speaker of the House
d) Their political party
Answer: b

The Canadian Parliament is located in which city?
a) Ottawa
b) Toronto
c) Montreal
d) Vancouver
Answer: a

What is the term for the process by which the Governor General dissolves Parliament, leading to a new federal election?
a) Disbanding
b) Prorogation
c) Abolition
d) Dissolution
Answer: d

The “Estimates” in the Canadian Parliament refer to:
a) The projected government expenses for the fiscal year
b) The projected revenues for the fiscal year
c) The projected economic growth for the fiscal year
d) The projected inflation rate for the fiscal year
Answer: a

How many readings does a bill typically go through in both the House of Commons and the Senate before becoming law?
a) One
b) Two
c) Three
d) Four
Answer: c

What is the term for the process by which Members of Parliament debate and discuss the details of a proposed bill?
a) First Reading
b) Second Reading
c) Committee Stage
d) Third Reading
Answer: c

The “Hansard” in the Canadian Parliament refers to:
a) The official record of parliamentary debates and discussions
b) The weekly publication of proposed bills
c) The list of government expenditures
d) The Prime Minister’s policy statements
Answer: a

The term “Caucus” in the Canadian Parliament refers to:
a) A group of government ministers
b) The Speaker of the House of Commons
c) Members of Parliament from the same political party
d) Senators from the same region
Answer: c

The “Senate Chamber” is where members of the Senate gather to:
a) Debate and discuss bills
b) Meet with constituents
c) Attend question periods
d) Present their election platforms
Answer: a

Which term refers to the period of time between elections when the government continues to function with a reduced scope of activity?
a) Recess
b) Prorogation
c) Session
d) Interregnum
Answer: b

The “Mace” in the Canadian Parliament symbolizes:
a) The authority of the Prime Minister
b) The Speaker’s role in maintaining order
c) The Queen’s presence
d) The power of the elected members
Answer: d

What is the role of the Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO)?
a) To draft the federal budget
b) To advise the Prime Minister on foreign policy
c) To review and analyze government spending and financial matters
d) To preside over parliamentary debates
Answer: c

The “Cabinet Solidarity” principle requires cabinet ministers to:
a) Express their personal opinions on government policies
b) Vote according to their personal beliefs
c) Vote along party lines and support government decisions
d) Seek approval from the Governor General before voting
Answer: c

What is the term for a proposal that is presented for debate and consideration in the Canadian Parliament?
a) Motion
b) Petition
c) Referendum
d) Decree
Answer: a

The “Official Languages Act” in Canada is aimed at:
a) Establishing French as the sole official language
b) Promoting Indigenous languages
c) Ensuring equal status for English and French
d) Encouraging the use of regional dialects
Answer: c

Which term refers to the process of ending a parliamentary session without dissolving Parliament?
a) Adjournment
b) Prorogation
c) Abolition
d) Disbanding
Answer: b

The “Rideau Hall” in Canada is the official residence of:
a) The Prime Minister
b) The Speaker of the House of Commons
c) The Governor General
d) The Leader of the Opposition
Answer: c

What is the term for the process by which the Governor General approves a bill and it becomes law?
a) Royal Approval
b) Executive Consent
c) Presidential Confirmation
d) Royal Assent
Answer: d

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