Canadian Supreme Court MCQs With Answer

What is the highest court in Canada?
a) Provincial Court
b) Federal Court
c) Supreme Court of Canada
d) Court of Appeal
Answer: c

How many justices typically sit on the Supreme Court of Canada?
a) 5
b) 7
c) 9
d) 11
Answer: c

Who appoints judges to the Supreme Court of Canada?
a) Prime Minister
b) Governor General
c) Chief Justice of Canada
d) Minister of Justice
Answer: a

How long is the term of office for a justice of the Supreme Court of Canada?
a) 5 years
b) 10 years
c) Until retirement at age 75
d) Lifetime appointment
Answer: c

Which term describes the authority of the Supreme Court to hear cases involving the interpretation of the Canadian Constitution?
a) Judicial review
b) Judicial activism
c) Constitutional jurisdiction
d) Appellate jurisdiction
Answer: c

In which city is the Supreme Court of Canada located?
a) Toronto
b) Montreal
c) Ottawa
d) Vancouver
Answer: c

What is the role of the Chief Justice of Canada?
a) To lead the executive branch of government
b) To oversee the federal court system
c) To preside over the Supreme Court of Canada
d) To draft new legislation
Answer: c

What does the term “binding precedent” mean in the context of the Supreme Court?
a) A precedent that is not followed by lower courts
b) A precedent that is established by a unanimous decision
c) A precedent that must be followed by lower courts in future cases
d) A precedent that applies only to criminal cases
Answer: c

What is the primary role of the Supreme Court of Canada?
a) To handle criminal cases exclusively
b) To hear cases related to international law
c) To review decisions of lower courts and tribunals
d) To mediate disputes between provinces
Answer: c

How are cases usually selected for review by the Supreme Court of Canada?
a) Through a lottery system
b) At the discretion of the Chief Justice
c) Based on the recommendation of the Minister of Justice
d) Through an application for leave to appeal
Answer: d

What is the “Sparrow test” used for?
a) Determining whether a case should be heard by the Supreme Court
b) Assessing the constitutionality of laws
c) Evaluating the validity of indigenous rights and title claims
d) Analyzing the credibility of witnesses in court cases
Answer: c

What is the “Charter of Rights and Freedoms”?
a) A document outlining the rights of Canadian citizens to firearms
b) A document outlining the fundamental rights and freedoms of Canadians
c) A document outlining the responsibilities of government officials
d) A document outlining the rights of indigenous peoples
Answer: b

What is the significance of the “Notwithstanding Clause” in the Canadian Constitution?
a) It allows the Prime Minister to override judicial decisions
b) It allows provinces to override certain sections of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms
c) It gives the Supreme Court the power to overturn legislation
d) It restricts the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court
Answer: b

What is the “Reference Power” of the Supreme Court of Canada?
a) The power to refer cases to lower courts
b) The power to interpret the Constitution in response to questions posed by the federal or provincial governments
c) The power to appoint judges to lower courts
d) The power to review decisions made by administrative tribunals
Answer: b

What is “judicial activism”?
a) The practice of judges avoiding controversial cases
b) The practice of judges making decisions that align with public opinion
c) The practice of judges interpreting the law strictly according to its wording
d) The practice of judges interpreting the law to reflect their own values and beliefs
Answer: d

Which term describes a situation where a judge decides to uphold a lower court’s decision without issuing a new decision?
a) Overruling
b) Affirming
c) Reversing
d) Rescinding
Answer: b

What is “collateral attack”?
a) A type of criminal offense
b) A legal strategy used by defense attorneys
c) A challenge to the constitutionality of a law outside the context of a specific case
d) A form of protest against a judicial decision
Answer: c

Which term refers to the authority of the Supreme Court of Canada to hear appeals from provincial and territorial courts of appeal?
a) Appellate jurisdiction
b) Constitutional jurisdiction
c) Exclusive jurisdiction
d) Original jurisdiction
Answer: a

What does the “Rule of Law” mean in the context of the Supreme Court?
a) The principle that the government is subject to the law
b) The principle that judges are above the law
c) The principle that laws can be changed by judicial decision
d) The principle that the Chief Justice has final authority over all decisions
Answer: a

Which term refers to a legal process that allows individuals or entities to request the Supreme Court’s opinion on a specific legal question?
a) Reference case
b) Appeal case
c) Charter case
d) Precedent case
Answer: a

What is the role of “interveners” in Supreme Court cases?
a) They are justices who mediate disputes between parties
b) They are legal scholars who provide expert opinions to the court
c) They are interested parties who are not directly involved in the case but provide additional perspectives
d) They are members of the public who observe court proceedings
Answer: c

What is the principle of “stare decisis” in the context of the Supreme Court?
a) The principle that lower courts must follow the decisions of the Supreme Court
b) The principle that the Chief Justice has the final say in all decisions
c) The principle that justices must always agree on the verdict
d) The principle that the government’s decisions are subject to judicial review
Answer: a

What is “appellate jurisdiction”?
a) The authority of the Supreme Court to hear cases involving constitutional questions
b) The authority of the Supreme Court to hear cases involving the government
c) The authority of the Supreme Court to hear appeals from lower courts
d) The authority of the Supreme Court to issue arrest warrants
Answer: c

Which term refers to a situation where a Supreme Court justice disagrees with the majority decision and writes a separate opinion?
a) Majority opinion
b) Dissenting opinion
c) Concurrent opinion
d) Precedent opinion
Answer: b

What is the “Oakes test” used for?
a) Evaluating the impartiality of Supreme Court justices
b) Determining whether a case should be heard by the Supreme Court
c) Assessing the constitutionality of laws that limit Charter rights
d) Analyzing the credibility of witnesses in court cases
Answer: c

What is the purpose of the “reasons for judgment” in Supreme Court cases?
a) To explain the reasoning behind the majority decision
b) To provide a summary of the case’s procedural history
c) To list the legal precedents considered during the case
d) To present the biography of each justice involved in the case
Answer: a

What is the “Van der Peet test” used for?
a) Evaluating the credibility of expert witnesses
b) Determining whether a case should proceed to trial
c) Assessing the constitutionality of laws that impact indigenous rights
d) Analyzing the impact of technological advancements on privacy rights
Answer: c

Which term describes the process of reconsidering a case that has already been decided?
a) Review
b) Reexamination
c) Appeal
d) Reviewability
Answer: b

What is the “Victoria Charter”?
a) A document outlining the rights of Canadian citizens to vote
b) A constitutional document that proposed reforms to the Constitution of Canada
c) A legal document used to challenge the constitutionality of laws
d) A document outlining the responsibilities of federal government officials
Answer: b

What does the term “ultra vires” mean in the context of the Supreme Court?
a) A Latin term meaning “beyond the powers”
b) A legal doctrine that limits the power of the federal government
c) A doctrine that grants the Supreme Court the power to create laws
d) A doctrine that allows the government to override judicial decisions
Answer: a

Which term describes a situation where a party in a case asks the Supreme Court to review a lower court’s decision?
a) Judicial review
b) Appellate jurisdiction
c) Appeal
d) Habeas corpus
Answer: c

What is the role of the Supreme Court in matters related to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms?
a) To amend the Charter based on evolving societal values
b) To enforce the Charter by striking down laws that violate it
c) To interpret the Charter in a way that favors the government
d) To refer Charter cases to the lower courts for resolution
Answer: b

Which term refers to a judge who agrees with the majority decision of the court but for different reasons?
a) Dissenting judge
b) Concurring judge
c) Appellate judge
d) Chief judge
Answer: b

What is the “Carter test” used for?
a) Determining the appropriate sentence in criminal cases
b) Assessing the credibility of expert witnesses
c) Evaluating the constitutionality of laws related to assisted suicide
d) Analyzing the impact of technology on privacy rights
Answer: c

Which term describes a situation where a judge disagrees with the majority decision and writes a separate opinion that supports the outcome?
a) Dissenting opinion
b) Concurring opinion
c) Precedent opinion
d) Overruling opinion
Answer: b

What is the “S. (S.D.) test” used for?
a) Evaluating the impact of technology on free speech rights
b) Determining the credibility of expert witnesses
c) Assessing the constitutionality of laws related to criminal sentencing
d) Analyzing the impact of international treaties on domestic law
Answer: c

Which term refers to a situation where a case is brought directly to the Supreme Court without going through lower courts?
a) Appellate jurisdiction
b) Exclusive jurisdiction
c) Reference case
d) Original jurisdiction
Answer: d

What is the “R. v. Oakes” case known for?
a) Establishing the principle of “reasonable apprehension of bias”
b) Challenging the constitutionality of criminal sentencing laws
c) Introducing the concept of “strict scrutiny” in judicial review
d) Establishing the “Oakes test” for limiting Charter rights
Answer: d

Which term refers to a situation where the Supreme Court reconsiders a decision it has made in a previous case?
a) Overruling
b) Reviewing
c) Revisiting
d) Rescinding
Answer: a

What is the “Godbout test” used for?
a) Determining the credibility of expert witnesses
b) Assessing the constitutionality of laws related to education
c) Evaluating the impact of technology on privacy rights
d) Analyzing the impact of international treaties on domestic law
Answer: b

Which term refers to the practice of interpreting laws in a way that aligns with modern societal values and circumstances?
a) Judicial activism
b) Judicial restraint
c) Statutory interpretation
d) Judicial review
Answer: a

What is the role of the “Supreme Court Act” in the Canadian legal system?
a) It outlines the powers of the federal government
b) It defines the role of the Prime Minister
c) It establishes the Supreme Court’s jurisdiction and procedures
d) It limits the authority of the Chief Justice
Answer: c

Which term refers to the principle that the Supreme Court will not review decisions made by the federal and provincial governments within their respective jurisdictions?
a) Doctrine of precedent
b) Doctrine of jurisdiction
c) Doctrine of federalism
d) Doctrine of deference
Answer: d

What is the “Dunsmuir framework” used for?
a) Evaluating the credibility of expert witnesses
b) Assessing the constitutionality of laws related to property rights
c) Determining the standard of review for administrative decisions
d) Analyzing the impact of international treaties on domestic law
Answer: c

Which term describes a situation where the Supreme Court declines to hear a case, leaving the lower court’s decision intact?
a) Reversing
b) Overruling
c) Affirming
d) Remanding
Answer: c

What is the “Marshall test” used for?
a) Evaluating the credibility of expert witnesses
b) Determining whether a case should proceed to trial
c) Assessing the constitutionality of laws related to indigenous rights
d) Analyzing the impact of technological advancements on privacy rights
Answer: c

Which term refers to the principle that the Supreme Court will not review political questions and matters that are best left to the elected branches of government?
a) Doctrine of jurisdiction
b) Doctrine of deference
c) Doctrine of precedent
d) Doctrine of discretion
Answer: b

What is the “R. v. Smith” case known for?
a) Establishing the “Smith test” for assessing the credibility of witnesses
b) Challenging the constitutionality of laws related to religious freedom
c) Introducing the concept of “reasonable limitations” in Charter rights
d) Establishing the “Smith test” for assessing the constitutionality of laws
Answer: b

Which term describes a situation where the Supreme Court makes a decision that applies only to the specific case at hand and does not establish a new legal precedent?
a) Binding precedent
b) Persuasive precedent
c) Ratio decidendi
d) Obiter dictum
Answer: d

What is the “R. v. Grant” case known for?
a) Establishing the “Grant test” for evaluating the credibility of expert witnesses
b) Challenging the constitutionality of laws related to freedom of expression
c) Introducing the concept of “reasonable expectation of privacy” in Charter rights
d) Establishing the “Grant test” for assessing the constitutionality of criminal laws
Answer: c

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